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Vitality Briefs Library

ISO 9001 & ISO 27001 Vitality Brief

Due to the increasing threat of cyber-attacks organizations want to be sure they are working with software vendors that prioritize security. However, ascertaining how secure a vendor is can be challenging. This vitality brief explains why ISO 9001 & ISO 27001 certification is a valuable signifier of an organization that will ensure security and compliance to deliver a secure terminal emulator.

Supply Chain Attacks Vitality Brief

Supply chain attacks are a rising form of cyber-attack. Supply chain attacks work by targeting an organization’s systems through compromised third-party software. This vitality brief explains how the best course of defence against a supply chain attack is for organizations to mandate the use of an end-to-end secured terminal emulator, with no plugins or applets.

Terminal Emulator Access on Windows 10

Windows 7 is considered depreciated as of January 14, 2020, with the ending of paid extended support coming on January 10th 2023. Many organizations still run client-side terminal emulators on Windows 7 and these have often not been upgraded to work on Windows 10. This means that once the deadline of 2023 happens organizations may be forced to run insecure versions of Windows 7, with no updates or security patches. Or, if they do upgrade to Windows 10, they risk losing access to their terminal emulators. Read this vitality brief for an explanation of how to solve this problem with a pure html web-based emulator.

Terminal Emulation on Any Browser

Web-based terminal emulators are increasingly popular, but the majority of them do not work on all web browsers. Some only work on Chrome, Microsoft Edge or Firefox. Some also require ActiveX or Java plugins. This leaves emulator users restricted in function and potentially vulnerable to security threats. Find out how to give web-based terminal emulator users full flexibility in browser choice- whether Samsung Internet, Safari, Internet Explorer or Opera, without compromising security and functionality.

Avoid Costly Terminal Emulation Audits

Terminal emulation software users are especially vulnerable to audits. Paper-based licensing, different types and versions of software and use by third parties can leave organizations unable to keep track of their usage, and therefore potentially liable for settlement payments. Find out how a dedicated licensing manager and centralized administration system can help reduce the need for and consequences of terminal emulation audits.

Terminal Emulation on Chromebooks

With the growing popularity of Chromebooks many organizations increasingly require terminal emulation access on them. However, the unique nature of the Chromebook OS means that many thick client emulators cannot be installed on the devices. This vitality brief gives an overview on how a pure-html terminal emulator, with no downloads or plugins, can ensure consistent terminal emulation access for all Chromebook users.

Terminal Emulation on Mobile Devices and Tablets

Terminal emulation software on mobile devices and tablets is a growing requirement for many organizations. However, the variety of operating systems such as iOS and Android and the variety of dimensions of iPhones, iPads and Androids can represent challenges when looking for a single emulator to be used across a variety of devices.

Find out how you can ensure consistent emulation access with just one single Flynet deployment. Including full pinch, zoom, panel resizing and form support functionality, automatically being optimized on every mobile device.

Dropped Connections

A vitality brief showing you how to solve dropped connections on IBMi. As more people work remotely, some terminal emulators are struggling to provide good service resulting in dropped connections over Citrix or other remote desktop services. Find out how to solve this issue in this vitality brief.

BYOD Policies for Mainframe, IBMi and Unix Applications

BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) policies mean that employees can access work systems from their own personal devices. Yet with a BYOD policy it is harder for organisations to set parameters and requirements for security policies, updates and usage. This can be particularly problematic with mainframe, IBMi and Unix applications. Learn the solution in this vitality brief.

Terminal Emulator Access on Windows 10

Windows 7 is considered depreciated as of January 14, 2020, with the ending of paid extended support coming on January 10th 2023. Many organizations still run client-side terminal emulators on Windows 7 and these have often not been upgraded to work on Windows 10. This means that once the deadline of 2023 happens organizations may be forced to run insecure versions of Windows 7, with no updates or security patches. Or, if they do upgrade to Windows 10, they risk losing access to their terminal emulators. Read this vitality brief for an explanation of how to solve this problem with a pure html web-based emulator.